GET A HEAD START ON THE SPRING TERM AND TAKE A CLASS THIS WINTER!

SPC’s Winter Session is a great way to earn credits in an accelerated format. These fully online courses run from Dec. 16, 2019 to Jan. 10, 2020, allowing you to earn credits in just four weeks. These classes count towards your Spring Term goals and can be paid for with your financial aid.

Already an SPC Student?

​New to SPC​?

Winter Session Course Offerings

Winter Session Classes (Spring Term 0555) | Dec. 16, 2019 - Jan. 10, 2020 Online

Course/Class Course Title Credit Hours Instructor
AMH1091 (#3751) African-American History 3 TBA
Description: This course examines the development of the Black presence in America. The concern will be to study the economic, social, and psychological factors that led to slavery, the practical consequences of slavery on Black and White social groups, the events and individuals who contributed to the elimination of slavery, the struggle for citizenship and self-worth, the artistic contributions, the social justice movement of the 1970's, and the current social condition defining the Black experience in America. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.
ARH1000 (#2799) Understanding Art 3 Jonathan Barnes
Description: This is a beginning course for any student curious about art and why it looks the way it does. Students will explore a variety of visual experiences in relationship to their seeing, feeling, thinking, and self. They will examine, discuss, and handle two- and three-dimensional media. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.
BSC1930 (#4198) Biological Issues 3 Christopher Nichol
Description: This course is designed to allow the student an opportunity to investigate current biological issues of importance to society through lecture and discussion. Issues may include, but are not limited to, methods of science, ethical issues in science, biological impact of environmental change, genes and genomes, biodiversity and evolution, populations, ecology and conservation of species and natural habitats, sociobiology, reproductive strategies, and the biological basis of cancer, AIDS and other diseases.
CGS1070 (#3769) Basic Computer and Information Literacy 1 Lawrence Ducey
CGS1070 (#3770) Basic Computer and Information Literacy 1 Gabriel Yeager
Description: This course is designed to develop computer and information literacy skills to help students become active participants in the Information Age. It introduces general computer operations using the microcomputer. Emphasis will be placed on using the mouse, disk and file management and overall desktop techniques. An introduction to a word processing and a spreadsheet program is included. Further, the course will introduce students to the core concepts of information literacy and essential techniques for locating, analyzing, organizing and presenting information for research purposes. The course stresses strategies for using a variety of electronic resources emphasizing technological skills and critical thinking abilities as well as coping with the changing nature of information resources, computer and internet ethics, and security. 16 contact hours.
ENC1101 (#3901) Composition I 3 Ian Wilson
Description: This course is designed to develop composition skills. It emphasizes the selection and restriction of topics; organization and development of the multi-paragraph essay; critical reading of texts; and practice in information retrieval from sources, including digital content. It also offers the student opportunities to improve proficiency with sentence structure, diction, and mechanics. Selected writing samples are examined as models of form and as sources of ideas for the student's own writing. Conferences provide individual instruction. Sections of computer-assisted and individualized instruction are offered. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. (Note: Credit is only given for ENC 1101 or ENC 1121H or IDS 1106. 47 contact hours.
ENC2210 (#3898) Technical Writing 3 Jennifer Haber
Description: This course is offered for students desiring experience in various types of technical writing, such as process reports, investigative reports, feasibility studies, instructions, memoranda, and letters. Concentration is on practice in analyzing and developing reports, in collecting and organizing data, and in preparing the formal and informal report. This course has value in the fields of business administration, military, engineering, health, hospitality, law enforcement, architecture, building construction, and science. Assignments are related to the individual interest of the student. (Note: This course has a substantial writing requirement). 47 contact hours.
GEB1011 (#4176) Introduction to Business 3 TBA
Description: The purpose of this foundational business course is to acquaint students with the tools and vocabulary needed in all aspects of the business world. This course will cover areas such as business ownership, management, marketing, financial services, supply chain management, sustainability/social responsibility, entrepreneurship and project management and how they function together to create value. 47 contact hours.
HFT1000 (#4175) Intro to Hospitality/Tourism 3 Alanna Olah
Description: This course is an introduction to the many facets of the hotel-motel and food service industries. The course includes a study of the history, scope and innovations in the industry. The course includes guest lectures from the industry and visits to local hospitality establishments. Students will see the advantages of the hospitality and tourism industry as a career path. 47 contact hours.
HUS2315 (#2791) Studies in Behavioral Modification 3 Chris Kerr
Description: This course is the study of the use of basic behavior modification techniques in the helping professions. Emphasis is on learning theory and motivation, reinforcement schedules, environmental events that impact human behavior, and practical application of the theories. 47 contact hours.
HUS2540 (#2792) Building Stronger Families and Communities 3 Chris Kerr
Description: This course provides an understanding of the essential role that human service professionals play in facilitating healthy families and communities. The effects of poverty, inequality, unemployment, child abuse, substance abuse, and domestic violence are included. The course provides strategies for empowering families to move to effective parenting, developing healthy life-styles, promoting self-esteem and self-worth, assuming responsibility, problem-solving skills, resolving conflicts, identifying alternatives, and making healthy choices. 47 contact hours.
MAC1105 (#3992) College Algebra 3 Paula Ralph
Description: Major topics include: functions and functional notation; domains and ranges of functions; graphs of functions and relations; operations on functions; inverse functions; linear, quadratic and rational functions; absolute value and radical functions; exponential and logarithmic properties, functions and equations; systems of equations and inequalities; applications such as curve fitting, modeling, optimization, exponential and logarithmic growth and decay. (Note: Credit is only given for MAC 1105 or MAC 1106.) 47 contact hours.
PHI1600 (#2828) Studies in Applied Ethics 3 Christian Moriarty
PHI1600 (#3025) Studies in Applied Ethics 3 TBA
Description: This course is a practical overview of key issues, questions and concepts in applied ethics. Special emphases are placed on the historical development of ethical thinking, a variety of ethical approaches and on multicultural aspects of ethics. Students will also examine a variety of personal, social and professional ethical issues and problems and learn methods of resolving them through the use of critical thinking skills, sound ethical reasoning and legal and professional codes. Students are provided an active learning experience, increased student interaction and opportunities for independent research into ethical issues of personal interest. This course has a substantial writing requirement. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. (Note: Credit is not given for both PHI 1600 and any of the following courses: PHI 1602H, PHI 2635, PHI 1631, 2649 or PHI 1603 or 2621 or PHI 2622. 47 contact hours.
POS2041 (#3121) American National Government 3 Heather Roberson
Description: This survey course provides a comprehensive examination of the American political system. Through this course, students will become familiar with theory, organization, principles, and function of the American national government, and various elements within the political system that work to shape policy outcomes. This course partially satisfies the Gordon Rule writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. (Note: Credit is only given for POS 2041 or POS 2041H or POS 2050 or POS 2050H or IDS 2103H.) 47 contact hours.
PSY1012 (#2844) Psychology 3 David Liebert
PSY1012 (#3018) Psychology (TENTATIVE) 3 David Liebert
Description: This course is an introduction to the field of psychology. It includes the history, scientific methodology, major theoretical schools of thought, various approaches to interpersonal functioning and human development. The psychological application of ethics as well as social and cultural diversity are integrated into the course. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Credit is not given for both PSY 1012 and PSY 1020H or IDS 1610. 47 contact hours.
REL2300 (#3778) World Religions 3 Marc Unger
Description: This course examines the general characteristics of the major religions of the world. Topics include the nature of religion, Indigenous Religions, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Christianity, Islam and New Religious Movements. Each is examined in its cultural context, how basic human concerns are addressed, the way purpose for life is defined, and the uniqueness of religious practice. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements outlined in the General Education and Enhanced World View Requirements. 47 contact hours.
SPC1017 (#3899) Introduction to Speech Communication 3 Robin Bower
SPC1017 (#4036) Introduction to Speech Communication 3 Robin Bower
Description: This course presents the various components of human communication and the communication process. Topics include perception, critical listening and thinking, verbal and nonverbal communication, intercultural communication, and gender communication. Students will compose and analyze messages that adapt to different audiences and will construct effective presentations for face-to-face and multi-media environments. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements as outlined in General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.
SPC1017 (#3900) Introduction to Speech Communication 3 David Fitzgerald
Description: This course presents the various components of human communication and the communication process. Topics include perception, critical listening and thinking, verbal and nonverbal communication, intercultural communication, and gender communication. Students will compose and analyze messages that adapt to different audiences and will construct effective presentations for face-to-face and multi-media environments. This course partially satisfies the writing requirements as outlined in General Education Requirements. 47 contact hours.
SYG2324 (#3771) Principles of Substance Abuse 3 Jay Charboneau
Description: An overview of substance abuse. Topics examined include: historical perspectives; identification, intervention and outcome of abusers and their families; treatment techniques; prevention, intervention and rehabilitation resources; types of therapeutic and support groups; and the pharmacology of commonly abused substances. The course is recommended for those persons who would like to gain knowledge about substance abuse and its effect in today's society. Prerequisite: (ENC 0025 or ENC 0020 or ENC 0990) or EAP 1695 or satisfactory score on the SPC placement test. Three hours weekly.

Need more classes?


The Board of Trustees of St. Petersburg College affirms its equal opportunity policy in accordance with the provisions of the Florida Educational Equity Act and all other relevant state and federal laws, rules and regulations. The college will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, age, national origin, marital status, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, or against any qualified individual with disabilities in its employment practices or in the admission and treatment of students. Recognizing that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination on the basis of sex and violates this Rule, the college will not tolerate such conduct. Should you experience such behavior, please contact Pamela Smith, the director of EA/EO/Title IX Coordinator at 727-341-3261; by mail at P.O. Box 13489, St. Petersburg, FL 33733-3489; or by email at eaeo_director@spcollege.edu.